Human Resource Management Good Practices


  

Introduction

Human Resource Management (HRM) is a planned approach to managing people effectively for performance. It aims to establish a more open, flexible and caring management style so that staff will be motivated, developed and managed in a way that they can give of their best to support departments* missions. Good HRM practices are instrumental in helping achieve departmental objectives and enhance productivity. For the purpose of sharing experience and providing reference in launching HRM initiatives, we have gathered in this booklet some good examples introduced by departments.

HRM Good Practices In Departments

Since launching HRM movement in 1994 in the civil service, the Civil Service Bureau has sponsored and individual departments have introduced various HRM initiatives. In taking HRM forward, we need a strategic and integrated approach in managing people effectively for performance.

In taking a strategic and integrated approach, HRM is linked to the department's strategic direction in a systematic way. Such an approach is often reflected in the following practices -

At the same time, all managers must adopt a more open, flexible and caring style in managing their staff. Such an approach is reflected in a number of ways. The three most common practices are -

Through experience in and analysis of various HRM initiatives, we have identified as given in the following section a list of HRM Good Practice Indicators which departments may use as reference when they embark on HRM initiatives and when they seek to evaluate their own HRM initiatives.

HRM Good Practice Indicators

Initiative

Good Practice Indicator

Articulation of Vision, Mission and Values (VMV)
  • Sense of purpose reflected in the department's VMV
  • Elements of service culture captured in the department's VMV
  • Involving staff in discussions and meetings to generate ownership
  • Management commitment shown in resource allocation in achieving department's VMV
  • Clear and effective communication programme in place to promote VMV
  • Offering training to develop skills and behaviour in living the VMV
  • Customer-focused culture reflected in departmental policies, procedures and practices
  • Measurement system in place to track performance improvement
  • Demonstration of understanding of VMV and observable behaviour
Drawing up HRM Plan
  • The HRM Plan developed under the leadership of the senior management
  • Department's strategic direction clearly articulated by the top team
  • Debate and endorsement of strategic and ongoing HR issues by the top team
  • HR actions to address HR issues debated, approved and prioritized by the top team
  • Department's VMV revisited as part of the strategic review process
  • An environment scan conducted to identify strategic HR issues
  • Staff's input on ongoing HR issues sought through, for example, staff opinion survey, focus group meetings, interviews, etc
  • Specific objectives and sets of actions clearly spelt out in the HRM Plan and clearly explained as to how each will help address certain HR issues in achieving departmental Vision and Mission,
  • Responsibilities to implement the HRM Plan clearly assigned
  • Realistic implementation plan with adequate resource support,
  • Review system in place
  • Development of a human resource information system
Manpower Planning
  • A systematic information system in place
  • A clear plan with action programmes in place to bridge supply and demand gaps, succession gaps, and competency gaps
  • Posting policy published and career paths made known to staff
  • Competency profiles of key job grades developed and made known to staff
  • Information derived from succession plan fed into training and development plans for individual officers
  • Career interviews arranged for staff to gauge staff aspiration and offer career guidance offered
  • Regular review and update of the plan and competency profiles
Performance Management System
  • Senior management's support and commitment in allocating the required resources and according priority to this function
  • Objective setting starting from the top and systematically cascaded and linked to the departmental objectives
  • All appraisers have been properly trained on PMS good practices and the required skills
  • Mechanisms to ensure openness, fairness and objectivity of the appraisal process
  • The system being competency-based to help identify training and development needs for staff and their potential for taking up higher responsibilities
  • Information gathered from the performance cycle linked to other human resource functions
  • Staff recognizing that performance management is a joint responsibility of the appraisee and the supervisor
  • Staff performance management being an ongoing process, not an annual event
  • Review of the performance management system
Training and Development
  • Individual and departmental Training and Development plans in place and strategically linked to departmental strategic objectives
  • A diverse set of training and development activities (e.g. overseas attachment, overseas training, secretariat attachment)
  • Training and Development integrated with PMS and Succession Plan / Manpower Plan
  • Timely induction training provided to all new staff with management training to be provided systematically afterwards
  • Regular review of the Training and Development policies
  • Evidence of improvement in work quality and efficiency,
  • Managers' positive feedback on learners' performance
  • Training courses rated highly in quality and relevance
Service Quality Enhancement
  • Customer focused culture as reflected in programmes, policies, procedures and practices
  • Productivity and efficiency enhanced
  • Staff taking more initiative to serve
  • Measurement in place to track performance improvement
  • Mode of operation being service oriented
  • Public image enhanced

Illustrations

In the following chapters, there are a number of cases, provided with the assistance of departments, on how good HRM practices can enhance service productivity and quality. The cases are grouped under the following categories -

mutilate.gif

Articulation of Vision, Mission and Values

mutilate.gif

Human Resource Management Plan

mutilate.gif

Manpower Planning

mutilate.gif

Performance Management

mutilate.gif

Training and Development

mutilate.gif

Service Quality Enhancement

The cases serve as examples illustrating how good HRM practices can help achieve departmental goals and objectives. As service nature and organisation structure vary from one department to another, departments should give due consideration to their own needs while drawing reference from the case examples in planning for their own HRM initiatives.

  

Human Resource Management Good Practices

Articulation of Vision, Mission and Values

Human Resource Management Plan

Manpower Planning

Performance Management

Training and Development

Service Quality Enhancement

Contact Persons for the Cases Listed in this Publication

btn49k.gif

Valid HTML 4.01 Strict Level Double-A conformance, W3C WAI Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0